Training

Hacking the Cultural System 

 

How and why do globalisation and modernisation together with cultural heritage and identity shape changing needs and values of consumers living in different and similar geographies? How do trends play out globally? How can you culturally interpret global consumer trends? And how do consumers around the world create and negotiate cultural meanings of global consumer trends? 

This cultural module is specifically aimed at helping you to apply and leverage a cross-cultural understanding of global consumer trends. In an increasig globalising world, culture doesn’t stop at the border. The variety of upcoming lifestyles globally has never been more rich and diverse, both across regions and within them. In this module you get a grip on the global cultural mechanics of change and you learn to culturally interpret and understand representations of international consumer trends of your interest across countries of different regions of your choice.

 

 

“Something new happening in the fashion scene in Amsterdam may spread to New York, or to Tokyo, quicker than it spreads to other parts of the Netherlands.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Why participate? 

After the training of this module: 

 

– you can culturally interpret and explain manifestations of global consumer trends around the world through different cultural lenses.

 

– you are aware of any (hidden) cultural blindspots you may have (in both cultural analysis and application).

 

– you can tackle the cultural complexities in the identification and application of global consumer trends.  

– you have a good understanding of the international Zeitgeist. 

 

– you created a global trendmap in which you apply and leverage a cross-cultural understanding of global consumer trends of your interest across countries in different regions of your choice.

Rozenbrood Trendacademy.

The training takes How and why do globalisation and modernisation together with cultural heritage and identity shape changing needs and values of consumers living in different and similar geographies? How do trends play out globally? How can you culturally interpret global consumer trends? And how do consumers around the world create and negotiate cultural meanings of global consumer trends?

  

About the trainer.

Hi, my name is Marleen. I am an independent cultural branding insights designer / Chinese consumer insights specialist / cultural insights specialist / ethnographic forecaster based in Arnhem in the Netherlands. Through Modern Chineseness and Hacking the Cultural System  I help innovative agencies and professionals in branding, content creation, consumer insights and trends to harness culture and to build a strong future-proof cultural strategic foundation to create consumer resonance in different markets. Ánd to help them to acquire the skills and insights to action against cultural appropriation and cultural bias. For themselves or their clients. So that they can generate deep cultural traction. 

 

If you have a question, please don’t hesitate to contact me.

Read more about global cultural trends

  

What is the cultural meaning of “balance” in a work-life balance? This global cultural trend has different challenges for South-Koreans than Danes.

 

The work expectations of the youngest generations has shifted in comparison with older generations. This has given rise to new education-lifestyle brands such as General Assembly and co-working spaces such as We Work or Hashtag Workmode (Dutch female workspace in The Netherlands).

 

According to a 2018 research report of Huawei “The new working order”, generation Z is throwing away the usual career paths. Instead of working the traditional 9 -5, climbing from intern to executive, Generation Z are now turning passions into pounds, using digital tools and exploring multiple skill sets to build custom careers that are bespoke to them.

 

 

 

  

 After the change workers in South Korea will be allowed to work 40 hours and an additional 12 hours of overtime. South Koreans have some of the longest working hours among the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development countries (OECD). In March, the country’s Gender Equality Minister called the working hours “inhumanely long” and claimed it as one of the major causes of the country’s alarmingly low birth rates and aging society. Danes on the other hand, according to the OECD Better life report, have a better work-life balance than any other country surveyed. Danes do not just live to work. Maintaining a good balance between time on the job and personal life is important to them, and employers respect his. When they are at work, they enjoy a high degree of flexibility. They can often choose when they start their working day and have the option of working from home. The lunch break is often at a designated time each day, enabling colleagues to interact and eat together, thus enabling them to leave their desks. Stop by a Danish office at 5pm and nearly every desk will be empty. While the Danes are hard workers, they prefer to do their jobs within Denmark’s 37 hour official work week. Staying extra hours is discouraged, and most employees leave at around 4pm to pick up their children and begin preparing the evening meal. 

 

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